Different Types of Trail Cameras ( Game Camera )

Learning about the animals that wander through your trails is much easier when you have a trail camera to record their actions. When you are ready to invest in a trail camera, there are many different types to choose from. It is a good idea to understand exactly what type of camera you need for the area that you want to record. Most of the cameras will have features like motion detectors, varying resolution, subtle flashes, and tough exterior boxes. These are the different types of cameras that will best help you see the deer and other creatures that frequent your favorite hunting grounds:

Motion-activated Camera

This is one of our favorite types of camera for trail use. It is a perfect choice for capturing images of creatures along your trails because it only captures motion and does not need to be on all of the time. Since the camera is only on for a limited amount of time, it requires very little battery use. You simply place the camera where you want it and once motion activates it, images are captures. It is a popular camera choice for hunters and wildlife photographers alike. One consideration is the range of the camera, because they will only capture images when the motion occurs within its scope. Any motion outside of its range will not be photographed.

SmartScouter Motion Activated Cellular Surveillance Camera

SmartScouter Motion Activated Cellular Surveillance Camera

Wireless Wi-Fi Camera

This type of camera uses a transmitter to send images directly to a computer. These are popular with hunters who want immediate knowledge of animals in the area. However, it does require a wireless network, so you cannot use them in dead zones. While they might sound like a complicated camera to use, they are designed to be easy to set up and they are completely wireless, so there is no need to use a USB cord. The cameras are small and easy to hide, which makes them great options for hunters. There are two major disadvantages to using Wi-Fi cameras. The first is that they do require Wi-Fi to work properly. The second is that they can be hacked, but there are ways to protect the computer that receives the messages so your vital information is safe.

Wireless Wi-Fi Camera

Spypoint Tiny-W2 Wireless Infrared Game Camera

Cellular Cameras

These cameras send the images through your cellphone – thus the name. You will need to use a camera with a SIM card and the camera does require the use of a data package to work – much like a smartphone. They often have motion sensors as the technology is advancing. These cameras install quickly and easily without the use of wires, but they are not always built to withstand the elements like other types of trail cameras. You might need to craft a weatherproof casing for this type of camera if you choose to use it. However, they are lightweight and easy to move, so they are less likely to be spotted by other hunters. They do require the use of batteries, so you will need to run tests to see how long the battery life will be. Like the Wi-Fi cameras, cellular cameras can also be hacked.

Cellular Cameras

Cellular Cameras

Infrared Cameras

Because so much animal activity occurs at night, an infrared camera is a top choice for hunters. This type of camera will shoot in all light conditions and will supply high resolution footage, too. Many have light sensors that will adjust to the infrared function when the lights go out. These are user friendly cameras that capture impressive details of night activity. They are easy to use and easy to install and most have a significant amount of storage. They tend to be sturdy and built to withstand the elements in all weather conditions. The biggest disadvantage is the costs, because they are priced higher than other types of cameras due to the infrared technology.

Infrared Digital Trail Camera

Infrared Digital Trail Camera

Flash Cameras

This type of camera is more affordable than infrared cameras, but they do use light to capture images. These are designed to get night shots, but they have to use a burst of light, which can make it difficult to capture several shots of animals in your vicinity. They are easy to install and easy to move around. They do have zoom features and the quality of image is good. The biggest problem is the flash because it can startle animals and they can learn to avoid it if it goes off repeatedly. They also use more battery to get the flash to light.

Flash trail Cameras

Flash trail Cameras

Security Camera

These are the last resort for trail cameras. These can be easy to install in the wild, but they are also rather easy to spot. They capture footage without wasting an excessive amount of battery power. But, they often have low resolution images. While they are easy to spot, they are less likely to be stolen simply because of the way they look. They are a good option for temporary cameras on the trail until you get an infrared or Wi-Fi camera. If you do decide to install security cameras on your trail, it is a good idea to understand what limitations these have due to local laws.

Security trail Camera

Security trail Camera

0
Shares
Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 0 comments

Leave a Reply: